I Am Not a "Biker Chick"

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Usually when the fact that I ride comes up in casual conversation, people start picturing something like this:

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It's even worse when they find out that I ride a Harley. The first thing people say is "Ooh, you're a biker chick." 

I always find myself having to explain that yes, I ride, but you won't find studs and skulls anywhere on my gear or bike. I don't have Harley Davidson t-shirts, or bras, or keychains, and I only have one set of piercings. 

It's not that there is anything wrong with women who identify as a "biker chick," but sometimes it can be alienating for women who would love to ride a motorcycle, but don't feel like they can relate to the stereotypical biker culture. 

So where is the sub-culture of women who ride, but work in an office and have to wear business attire all the time? Who spends an ungodly amount of money on Starbuck's lattes and loves to get dolled up for fancy dinners? 

I spend most of my time on my bike commuting to my office job, where I have to change into work appropriate clothes, use a curling iron to fix my helmet hair, and put on a dab of lipstick. Then, no matter how many times I walk around in a skirt or dress, I'll have a coworker jokingly ask "So did you ride your bike in that?" 

I'm dying to find other lady riders who share my experience with riding. If you're out there, be loud about it! Let it be known that not all women riders wear studs and skulls. We wear pearls and pencil skirts too. 

LifestyleAlisabeth McQueen